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Water + Technology

September 29, 2016

Technology and saving water. They go together like peanut butter and jelly. Ok, maybe not so much like peanut butter and jelly, but more like peanut butter and bananas.

We’ve all heard the different ways and tips on how to save water. But if for some reason you’ve been living under a rock, we’ve got you covered – here are some tips to start off with. So what tech tools and resources are out there that can help you save water?? Glad you asked.

1. Dropcountr – Do you have a lawn? Did it rain? Was there a leak? So many things can affect your water usage, and Dropcountr can help you to understand it. Know your water usage today, not when you get an unexpected bill..

2. WaterSmart Software – This is software that utilities can use to help customers manage and understand their water usage.

3. Drones – Yes, people actually use these to help with saving water. California farmers, in particular, are using drones to help make sure that the drip systems they use for their crops are working properly. Equipped with thermal cameras, drones can help farmers scan their land/crop for any leaks.

4. Cloud-based irrigation controllers – For those who have irrigation systems, a cloud-based irrigation system controller could be a good way to help manage your system on the go and at your fingertips.

Now these technologies are great tools to help save water but there is one easier way that you can invest in technology that isn’t as ‘complicated’ as the ones listed above. In fact, it’s right under your (dare I say it)… derrière. A toilet with the technology to do the same thing but so simple that you don’t even notice, have to monitor it, or change your daily habits. All you have to do is flush and BOOM… you’re saving water. How? The federal standard for a high-efficiency toilet is 1.6 gallons per flush. But why use one that flushes at 1.6 GPF when there is a toilet that uses HALF of that?